Sir Doug and the Genuine Texas Cosmic Groove plays SXSW Film

sxsw-film-logo

Pleased to announce the film that I’ve been directing in association with Arts + Labor Productions has been accepted into the 2015 South By Southwest Film Festival and will screen sometime around March 17-21. The film will have its premiere screening in Austin on Thursday April 9, and its San Antonio premiere at the San Antonio Book Festival on Saturday April 11.

Link is here http://schedule.sxsw.com/2015/events/event_FS18152

The story below:

SirDougpromophot

Synopsis

Sir Doug & The Genuine Texas Cosmic Groove tells the story of Doug Sahm, the wild man musicians’ musician and unsung hero of Texas music. A country music child prodigy and teenage rhythm & blues dynamo who caused a riot at his San Antonio high school, Sahm emerged as an international rock star leading the Sir Douglas Quintet. He landed in San Francisco just in time for the Summer of Love in 1967. He returned to Texas as the cowboy hippie rocker who built a burgeoning music scene in Austin in before forming the Tex-Mex super group The Texas Tornados. A kinetic, quirky character with a solid sense of place as well as an innate wanderlust, Doug Sahm’s story is the story of Texas music.

Section: Documentary Feature
Premiere Status: World Premiere
Country: USA
Language: English
Year: 2015
Runtime: 76min

Director: Joe Nick Patoski

Executive Producer: Louis Black, Alan Berg

Producer: Dawn Johnson,

Screenwriter: Joe Nick Patoski, Jason Wehling

Cinematographer: Yuta Yamaguchi

Editor: Cody Ground

Production Designer: Caroline Karlen

Sound Designer: Eric Friend

Additional Credits: Executive Producer: Abe Zimmerman, Associate Producer: Kristin Johansen-Berg, Associate Producer: Craig Parks, Associate Producer: Joe Bailey, Jr., Art Director: Jennymarie Jemison

Principal Cast: Doug Sahm, Shawn Sahm, Flaco Jimenez, Augie Meyers, Ernie Durawa, George Rains, Alvin Crow, Bill Bentley, Ray Benson, Spot Barnett
Details
Access
Film Badge, Gold Badge, Platinum Badge, Film Festival Wristband
Type
Documentary Feature
Screening Section
24 Beats Per Second
Tags
Convergence

Joe Nick Patoski has authored books on Willie Nelson, Selena, and Stevie Ray Vaughan, and written about Texas music for Texas Monthly and Rolling Stone. The one story he has wanted to tell most, though, is this one: the saga of Doug Sahm, the greatest musician to emerge from Texas during the 20th century.

Public Film Contact
Dawn Johnson
Arts+Labor
dawn@arts-and-labor.com
(512)374-0000

Publicity Contact
Dawn Johnson
dawn@arts-and-labor.com

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Paul English, Willie’s Outlaw, in the Oxford American

I am very pleased to have my profile of Paul English in the Texas Music issue of the Oxford American. Paul is the backbone of Willie Nelson’s family and for good reason. Order a copy today from oxfordamerican.org

OAcover

In the meantime, the whole story is here on the new Oxford American website, OxfordAmerican.org http://www.oxfordamerican.org/magazine/item/463-watching-willie-s-back

Paul English w Willie

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Joe Nick’s Texas Music Hour of Power, Saturday nite 6-8 central

Marfatrion

txbrags1

www.marfapublicradio.org

Every Saturday nite, yours truly hosts the Texas Music Hour of Power, showcasing all kinds of Texas sounds created over the past century of recorded music. The show runs two hours because Texas spans two time zones and frankly, the music is too dang big to limit it to one hour.

You can dial it in online at www.marfapublicradio.org or use the Tune-In app, I Tunes, or the Public Radio Player app for KRTS-FM in Marfa.

If you’re in Far West Texas, you can hear the show on these fine frequencies – KRTS 93.5 FM in Marfa, KRTP 91.7 FM in Alpine, KDKY 91.5 FM in Marathon, and KXWT 91.3 in Odessa/Midland/Notrees

And do join in on our on-air discussion by subscribing to my newsfeed Joe Nick Patoski on Facebook (where my trusty assistant Dick Thompson leads the Image Wranglers posting images and providing the back stories to the music that’s playing in real time, transforming listening to radio into a visual, multimedia experience. We call it Picture Radio

Here is the Facebook link: https://www.facebook.com/joenickp

and come over the Texas Music Hour of Power page on Facebook and give us a Like while digging the Texas music we dig up to share during the rest of the week: https:www.facebook.com/TexasMusicHourofPower

Each week, the show is posted here when it airs, for your listening pleasure.

October 4’s first hour is here

and la hora numero dos – esta aqui

Here’s the first hour of the September 27 show

and the second hour

Here’s the first hour of the September 20 show

Here’s the second hour of the September 20 show

First hour of Sept 13 show

Here’s the second hour of the September 13 show

First hour of Sept 6

and here’s the second hour

Here’s the first hour of the August 30 show for your listening and dancing pleasure

la hora numero dos esta aqui

Here’s the first hour of August 23 show

and the second hour

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Texas Accordion Kings and Queens this Sat

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Accordionistas! The 25th Accordion Kings and Queens is at Miller Outdoor Amphitheater in Houston this Sat nite – 6 pm, gratis! gratis! gratis! CJ Chenier and the Red Hot Louisiana Band, Rio Jordan, and tributes to Valerio Longoria, Mark Halata and Texavia, Ginny Mac, and Conteno con Los Halcones, along with winners of the Big Squeeze talent contest.

deets are at TexasFolklife.org http://www.texasfolklife.org/event/25th-annual-accordion-kings-queens-0

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Where to dance, Texas-style

As seen in USA Today, March 28, 2014
http://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/destinations/10greatplaces/2014/03/27/texas-dance-halls/6957465/

Gruene-HExterior-Courtesy-of-Robert-Fletcher

by Larry Bleiberg

Long before Pandora and Spotify, music lovers found entertainment at dance halls. In Texas, the tradition continues in sites that have become cultural landmarks. “You’re someplace special, and the music is respected and honored. It’s a whole encompassing experience,” says Joe Nick Patoski, a journalist who hosts the weekly Texas Music Hour of Power. He shares some favorite spots with Larry Bleiberg for USA TODAY.

ALSO ONLINE: Beautiful Texas: Photos of the Lone Star State

Gruene Hall
Gruene, Texas
Bands go out of their way to play Gruene, which calls itself the oldest dance hall in Texas. Located in a former ghost town, the white clapboard saloon helped launch stars such as Lyle Lovett and George Strait. On summer nights, the un-air-conditioned space with a wooden dance floor packs in crowds. “It’s a good sweat,” Patoski says. “If anyone plays the Texas circuit, they play Gruene.” 830-606-1281; gruenehall.com

Neon Boots Dancehall & Saloon
Houston
This classic country music venue, where Willie Nelson once played with the house band, now calls itself Texas’ largest LGBT country and western club. “This is where modern culture meets old tradition,” Patoski says. “It shows how pervasive country dance music is in Texas. It doesn’t matter who’s doing the boot-scooting. It’s the same old thing.” 713-677-0828; neonbootsclub.com

Billy Bob’s Texas
Fort Worth
While the world’s largest honky-tonk might not be an intimate venue, it offers such extras as bull riding for guests willing to sign a waiver. “It’s an urban-cowboy setting. They have big headlining acts, and what it lacks in history and texture, it makes up in bigness,” Patoski says. 817-624-7117; billybobstexas.com

Music City Texas Theater
Linden, Texas
This former theater is the go-to place for music in East Texas, Patoski says. While it’s a sit-down performance venue, which makes it more like an opry than a dance hall, it has a deep history. It’s run by Richard Bowden, who played with Don Henley and Glenn Frey, who went on to form the Eagles. 903-756-9934; musiccitytexas.org

Broken Spoke
Austin
This Texas institution celebrates its 50th anniversary this year. Now it’s a holdout, surrounded by a new mixed-use apartment complex. “They’re used to be dozens of honky-tonks like the Broken Spoke,” Patoski says. “You can’t come to Austin without going to the Spoke if you want to have a music experience.” 512-442-6189; brokenspokeaustintx.com

Stagecoach Ballroom
Fort Worth
This family-run hall maintains an old-school atmosphere with vintage lights and a 3,500-square-foot floor for twirling couples. It even offers free dance lessons before many shows. “If you’re in Fort Worth and you want to hear country music, this is where to go,” Patoski says. 817-831-2261; stagecoachballroom.com

Luckenbach Texas
This legendary dance hall found its fame in the Waylon Jennings song that took its name from the Hill Country ghost town. Patoski says the song doesn’t do it justice. “Luckenbach is like stepping back in time 100 years. It’s a great place to pitch washers and horseshoes and have a beer, even if you don’t go into the dance hall.” 830-997-3224; luckenbachtexas.com

Crider’s Rodeo & Dancehall
Hunt, Texas
This seasonal Hill Country getaway along the upper Guadalupe River is one the state’s premier outdoor dance venues, Patoski says. “Before air-conditioning in Texas, you always went to the hills to cool off. Why dance in a stuffy old dance hall? Just do it outdoors.” It’s open weekends from Memorial Day to Labor Day, with a rodeo and live band every Saturday night. 830-238-4441; on Facebook

Schroeder Hall
Schroeder, Texas
This spot in cattle-ranching country on the coastal prairie proudly calls itself the “second-oldest dance hall in Texas,” leaving others to argue about which was first, Patoski says. Expect to find local and regional bands and enthusiastic dancers. “Once upon a time, every small town in Texas had a place like this. There’s nothing around it. It’s real rural music,” Patoski says. 361-573-7002; schroederdancehall.com

John T. Floore’s Country Store
Helotes, Texas
This San Antonio-area hall, which is on the National Register of Historic Places, is famous for its tamales, although its performance roster included Elvis, Hank Williams, Patsy Cline, Bob Dylan and more. During the summer, the outdoor patio is packed with dancers. “It’s just a cool old joint,” Patoski says. 210-695-8827; liveatfloores.com

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Austin music pioneer Doug Sahm’s legacy (CultureMap)

http://austin.culturemap.com/news/music_film/11-13-13-doug-sahm-cactus-cafes-documentary/
Doug-Sahm_112047

A pioneer of the Austin music community, Doug Sahm was the master of so many authentically “Texas” sounds — western, Tex-Mex, rock ‘n’ roll — that live on in the music of the Texas Tornados and the Sir Douglas Quintet.

Though he passed away in 1999, Sahm’s influence is weaved into Austin music culture. Next week, KUT (along with a few choice friends) hopes to preserve that influence for generations to come.

“His story is the story of Texas music — no individual could play Texas’s indigenous sounds so skillfully and authentically,” says Joe Nick Patoski

On Monday, November 18, the Cactus Cafe will host a special edition of Views and Brews titled “Doug Sahm: All About the Groove.” Hosted by Jody Denberg, the celebration of Sahm will include local music royalty Marcia Ball, Speedy Sparks (Sahm’s guitar player) and Ernie Durawa (drummer for the Texas Tornados), as well as noted Texas writer and historian Joe Nick Patoski.

The event takes place on the 14th anniversary of Sahm’s death and will explore Austin music in the early 1970s, as well as Sahm’s influence on the local scene’s becoming nationally — and internationally — recognized. Panelists hope to celebrate a true Austin stalwart, opening the eyes — and ears — of younger generations to a soulful sound that still plays an important part in our modern culture.

(If you want proof, just wander down the block to Hole in the Wall, where Sir Doug’s music is immortalized in the jukebox.)

“For me, Doug is one of the touchstones of Texas music and one of the early founders of Austin’s vibrant music community. He’s a major reason I moved here in the early ’70s,” says Joe Nick Patoski.

“It’s time to let folks who have no idea who this Sahm character was/is appreciate one of the most beautiful cats to have graced a stage in Austin.”

“His story is the story of Texas music — no individual could play Texas’ indigenous sounds (country-western, western swing, rhythm and blues, jump blues, conjunto and rock ‘n’ roll) so skillfully and authentically. At the same time, he represented my generation of Texans, who thought differently and outside the box [and] who had to come to Austin to find our place.”

During the event, Patoski will premiere the sizzle reel of a proposed documentary about Sahm. “Jan Reid wrote a fine biography of Doug. The world doesn’t need another Doug book,” he says. “Printed words are great, but for those of us who knew Doug, there’s really no better way to tell his story than with his music, his voice and the voices of others who worked and played with him. In other words, on film.”

If the reel does its part, Patoski plans to secure funding and have a full documentary finished in time for SXSW 2015. “[Fourteen] years after his passing,” says Patoski, “it’s time to let folks who have no idea who this Sahm character was/is appreciate one of the most beautiful cats to have graced a stage in Austin.”

Views and Brews takes place at the Cactus Cafe on Monday, November 18. Doors open at 6:30 pm, and the event runs 7 pm – 8:30 pm. Entry is free, but donations are accepted.

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A Doug Sahm Groove-In Mon Nov 18 Cactus Cafe

Sahm_Cactus_11_18

Come on out to the Cactus Cafe on the University of Texas campus on Monday evening, November 18 for a Views and Brews discussion about Doug Sahm, the original Austin groover moderated by Jody Denberg of KUTX and featuring Marcia Ball, Ernie Durawa, and Speedy Sparks in a panel discussion, along with a screening of a four minute sizzler reel of a proposed film documentary directed by Joe Nick Patoski. Doors 6:30, show at 7

Doors 6:30 showtime 7 pm

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