True Believers, Kickstarter, you, and me

True Believers now:

True Believers then (photos by Theresa DiMenno):

Way back in the mid 1980s, I managed a rock and roll band called The True Believers, a three-guitar five-piece ensemble in Austin whose members were Jon Dee Graham, Alejandro Escovedo, Javier Escovedo, Rey Washam and Denny DeGorio. It was my last flirtation with the so-called music business before returning to writing full-time. They recorded one album for EMI-Rounder and had another one ready for release when they were dropped by EMI. That second record was released a few years later as a two-fer with the first album on Rykodisc as Hard Road.

That was that. Alejandro, Jon Dee, and Javier have all enjoyed successful solo careers, although the memories of the band remain strong.

Last September, they reunited to play a benefit in Austin for Brent Grulke, their onetime sound man who was the creative director for South By Southwest. The band had so much fun, they’ve decided to do it again, one more time, playing SXSW (Saturday, March 16 at Austin City Limits Live at the Moody Theater, late), lining up some May dates and going into the studio again.

Only, there’s not much of a music business left. So rather than be disappointed by some A&R weasel at a record company in Los Angeles, the True Believers are going Kickstarter, raising money to cut a single just after SXSW. Who knows if it will pay off? The cool thing is, if enough fans raise $5,000 they’ll get a brand new single out of the bargain, have ownership in the band, and prime the pump for a whole new album.

Raising dough, playing SXSW and cutting a record have sucked me back into to the music business. It’s unfinished business for me, and for them. Check em out and jump on board. Whoever you are, you’re sure more fun to deal with than an under assistant West Coast record weasel.

And for those willing to invest in some over the top Texas rock, we salute you.

True Believers Recording Project on Kickstarter here:
http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1763258740/true-believers-recording-project

Website here TheTroobs.com

Facebook page here: facebook.com/True-Believers

Continue Reading

Joe Nick’s Texas Music Hour of Power now every Sat nite

Yep, Joe Nick’s Texas Music Hour of Power has gone weekly, and we’ve been stretching to two hours now, 6-8 pm central, every Saturday night.

You can listen online via MarfaPublicRadio.org

or in Far West Texas, on KRTS, 93.5 FM in Marfa, KRTP, 91.7 in Alpine, KDKY, 91.5 FM in Marathon, and on KXWT, The Big X Across West Texas on 91.3, Odessa-Midland.

Requests or comments? e me at Texas@MarfaPublicRadio.org

Here’s the first hour of the Jan 4 show for your personal listening pleasure

and the second hour

Continue Reading

talking on Prairie Home Companion

. Watching the broadcast from backstage was fascinating. Being part of it was beyond fun.

So I was in Houston Friday night, talking the Dallas Cowboys at Brazos Bookstore and spinning vinyl at Leon’s Lounge, as well as hanging with my friends William Michael Smith of the Houston Press and Jack Massing of The Art Guys and sword-fighting with Max Massing. I’d noticed my old player-coach of the Jack’s Auto Repair All-Stars of the Twin Cities Cultural Arts Softball League, Garrison Keillor, was hosting A Prairie Home Companion at the Wortham Opera House in Houston on Saturday. I sent an email to the show and Friday afternoon received an email from Garrison. Long and short of it, and unbeknown to me until about 10 minutes before airtime, I had the pleasure of enjoying a few minutes of conversation with Garrison on his show, which is during the third segment.

I love radio and this program is the best of what radio is

Here’s a link to the broadcast.
prairiehome.publicradio.org/programs/2012/11/17

Continue Reading

Lubbock, Texas, Buddy Holly’s hometown

Last part of the stories behind the story of my West Texas Music drive, one of 16 drives featured in the June 2012 Texas Monthly Drive issue.

June 2012 issue

Today, we conclude where it all started, at least for the teenagers known as Buddy Holly and the Crickets.

The Hub City is the largest city in all the Great Plains, and home to Texas Tech University. But for all its assets, the city’s contribution to rock and roll is the one that continues to resonate around the world, even if some of the locals are still uncomfortable with the social implications the music wrought.

THE BUDDY HOLLY CENTER is Lubbock’s all-purpose museum with art exhibitions and traveling exhibits, and music on the patio during summer months. The main attraction, of course, is Buddy Holly, whose life is celebrated in the Buddy Holly Gallery, a permanent exhibit at the center with a $5 admission fee.

Showcases are devoted to Buddy’s childhood with his leatherwork, Cub Scout uniform, and drawings of cowboys and horses, and self-portrait in pencil, and his personal record collection, which includes The Midnighters’ “Sexy Ways” and Larry Williams’ “Slow Down;” his early influences; his rapid rise; Petty’s studio; and to the Crickets.

The Gallery features the writing of Robert Palmer from the Rolling Stone Illustrated History of Rock and Roll, a music timeline from 1929 to 1959, and a touch screen It’s So Easy trivia quiz prepared by the late Bill Griggs, the World’s #1 Buddy fan. It isn’t as easy as Griggs would have you believe.
Sample question: Buddy had a pet cat named Booker T and a pet dog named
a) Charcoal
b) Reddy Teddy
c) Alonzo, the correct answer

As Holly’s renown grew, his glasses got bigger, although the pair he died with, which are on display, were classic black horn-rimmed frames.

There’s a 15 minute film where Paul McCartney makes clear the Beatles’ biggest influence were the Crickets, Keith Richard discusses the Holly sound, Don McLean discusses “American Pie,” his song about the plane crash that killed Holly, Richie Valens, and the Big Bopper, J.I. Allison demonstrates rhythm, and Vi Petty plays Celeste. Gallery admission: $5

An adjacent room with no admission fee is the West Texas Hall of Fame loaded with great casual photos of Holly and Jennings, along with a special shoutout to Bill Griggs, the world’s #1 Holly fan who spent the last years of his life in Lubbock by choice. The Ivy West Texas Music Map illustrated by John Chinn in the center’s hallway shows all the talent who came out of the region. 1801 Crickets Avenue @ 19 th St., 806 767-2686, buddyhollycenter.org

Directly across from the center is the West Texas Walk of Fame, honoring entertainment celebrities from the region (hey, y’all, where’s Natalie Maines?) whose centerpiece is a life-sized statue of Buddy Holly brandishing a guitar.

THE CACTUS THEATER, a block from the Buddy Holly Center, is Don Caldwell’s musical labor of love and the linchpin of the Depot Entertainment District. The Cactus presents live music and musical performances most weekends and many weeknights. The Buddy Holly Story musical has enjoyed several extended runs in this lovingly restored 30s vintage venue.
1812 Buddy Holly Ave. @ 19th, 806 762 3233 cactustheater.com

KDAV AM 1590, one of the coolest oldies radio stations anywhere, welcomes visitors to step inside the radio station and see the disc jockeys in action up close and personal. The station bills itself as the Buddy Holly station, and I gotta say, there’s something about hearing “That’ll Be the Day” crackling over the AM radio while cruising Lubbock’s wide streets that make everything seem right in the world.
1714 Buddy Holly Ave., 806 744 5859 kdav.org/kdav

LUBBOCK HIGH SCHOOL is Buddy Holly and the Crickets’ alma mater as well as the most significant architectural structure in the city. The red-tile roofed, sand brick high school is between downtown and the Tech campus on
2004 West 19th @ Avenue D, 806 766 1444. Call the administration office in advance to request a hall pass to view the Buddy Holly showcase in the hallway

STUBB’S BARBECUE is where folks like Joe Ely, Butch Hancock, Jimmie Dale Gilmore, Terry Allen and the rest of the Lubbock mob played back in the 1970s before all of them, Stubbs included, moved away. The Stubbs barbecue sauce legend started here as did some storied events such as Jesse Taylor’s Sunday Night Jam and the night when Tom T. Hall played pool with Joe Ely using an onion as the cue ball. Underneath the statue of Stubbs in overalls holding a heaping plate of ribs is a small plaque that reads “There will be no bad talk or loud talk in this place” – Mr. Stubblefield’s mantra that was written on his menus and posted throughout his joint. Having enjoyed the establishment in its heyday, it’s startling to see how small the building footprint is today. 108 E. Broadway http://stubbsbbq.com/started.php

Continue on East Broadway to MLK, turn right and continue to Teak and follow the signs to the Lubbock cemetery and the final resting place of Buddy Holly. The simple gravesite is plainly marked. Tradition mandates you leave a guitar pick on the flat headstone. The earth from which Holly sprang from and to which he returned may look hard and desolate, but it’s fertile soil for music makers who sound like Texas.

Continue Reading
1 5 6 7 8 9 11